Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that knows the Self Storage business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
Jerry has been our accountant since we started in the self storage business, some 20 years ago. I look to him as more than an accountant, but as a valuable business asset. He is continually suggesting new ways to reduce costs and improve profits. Also, he has developed some unconventional reports that are very helpful in evaluating our business on a day to day basis. I would recommend him to any self storage operator.
Dennis Geiler
SoCal Self Storage, Southern California

7 of the Biggest Mistakes People Make When Choosing a Financial Advisor

Choosing a financial advisor is a big decision. 

Being aware of these seven common blunders when choosing an advisor can help you find peace of mind, and avoid years of stress. 

1. Hiring the First Advisor You Meet

While it’s tempting to hire the advisor closest to home or the first advisor in the yellow pages, this decision requires more time. Take the time to interview at least a few advisors before picking the best match for you. 

2. Choosing an Advisor with the Wrong Specialty

Some financial advisors specialize in retirement planning, while others are best for business owners or those with a high net worth. Some might be best for young professionals starting a family. Be sure to understand an advisor’s strengths and weaknesses - before signing the dotted line. 

3. Picking an Advisor with an Incompatible Strategy

Each advisor has a unique strategy. Some advisors may suggest aggressive investments, while others are more conservative. If you prefer to go all in on stocks, an advisor that prefers bonds and index funds is not a great match for your style. 

4. Not Checking References

Most advisors are happy to offer references to prospective clients. Calling references only takes a couple of minutes, and it can help put you at ease when handing over the keys to your bank account. 

5. Not Asking about Credentials

To give investment advice, financial advisors are required to pass a test. Ask your advisor about their licenses, tests, and credentials. Financial advisors tests include the Series 7, and Series 66 or Series 65. Some advisors go a step further and become a Certified Financial Planner, or CFP.  

6. Making Assumptions When They are Affiliated with a Reputable Brand

An advisor might appear qualified and professional due to an association with a major firm like J.P. Morgan or Morgan Stanley. Working with an advisor from a reputable firm can lead to stability and better tools and information. However, choose an advisor because they are the best fit, not because of their branding. 

7. Not Understanding How They are Paid

Some advisors are "fee only" and charge you a flat rate no matter what. Others charge a percentage of your assets under management. Some advisors are paid commissions by mutual funds, a serious conflict of interest. If the advisor earns more by ignoring your best interests, do not hire them. 

By Matt Wiley

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