Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that knows the Self Storage business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
Selecting a CPA goes far beyond a professional to prepare the tax return, or even to help with a little planning to reduce taxes. Jerry not only has the expertise and experience to meet and exceed the tax prep requirement, but goes far beyond with retirement planning and he advises in making business decisions that could have a tax impact in the future. What really sets Jerry apart from the crowd is that he not only has a lot of Self-Storage experience, but he cares about my business, and looks for ways to help me make MORE money. Anyone can find a CPA to spend money, but it is rare to find one that actually INCREASES my revenue…and then protects it from taxation! Jerry is a “keeper”!
RK Kliebenstein
Author “How to Make MORE Money in Self Storage”

New Requirement Applies to Any Business Seeking a Tax ID Number

IRS offers data security tips

The Internal Revenue Service wants small business taxpayers and the self-employed to know that, starting May 13, an important change will affect the way it issues employer identification numbers, or EINs.

With identity theft on the rise in the business community, the agency also offered business taxpayers tips and resources for protecting their data from theft.  

National Small Business Week is May 5-11. For more than 50 years, the week has recognized the important contributions of America’s entrepreneurs and small business owners.

Securing Your Passwords and Physical Devices

Part of securing your passwords is understanding how they become compromised. Two of the most frequent ways passwords are compromised is through Brute-Force attacks and data breeches. In a Brute-Force attack, hackers are using a systematic plan to check all possibilities until the correct one is found. If a hacker knows that the site requires a minimum of 8 characters and requires the use of both alphabetical and numeric characters they will start with those parameters. This is not done by hand. They write programs to do the dirty work.

So how do you defeat attacks like this?  First don’t make it easy on the attacker. Never do the bare minimum.  If a site requires a minimum of an 8 character password with at least one number: abcdefg1 is not a good password.  Sure it meets the site’s requirements, but a Brute-Force attack will have that password in no time.  So how should you craft your password?  The best passwords are a minimum of 16 characters and include a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters, as well as numbers, symbols and spaces.

Of course, there’s a problem with having strong passwords, they are impossible to remember.  Using a plugin like LastPass can help you safely store passwords, but what you should have enabled, on all of your logins that include the feature, is two-factor authentication.  Two-factor authentication will require you to also enter a code that’s sent to you, typically to you via text message, before allowing you access.  As you read that you may think to yourself, what a pain that extra step creates, but what you’re doing is preventing someone else to access you account.  Even if your bank password has been acquired through a Brute-Force attack or is part of one of the numerous database breeches, the moment your username and password are entered the hacker will be prompted with the send a code link.  Well what do they do send the code to you, so you know something is wrong, or just give up there?  Chances are they give up. 

Here’s What People Should Know About Reporting Cash Payments

Federal law requires a person to report cash transactions of more than $10,000 to the IRS. Here are some facts about reporting these payments.

Who’s covered

For purposes of cash payments, a “person” is defined as an individual, company, corporation, partnership, association, trust or estate. For example:

IRS warns of new phone scam using Taxpayer Advocate Service numbers

The Internal Revenue Service today warned the public about a new twist on the IRS impersonation phone scam whereby criminals fake calls from the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS), an independent organization within the IRS.

Similar to other IRS impersonation scams, thieves make unsolicited phone calls to their intended victims fraudulently claiming to be from the IRS. In this most recent scam variation, callers “spoof” the telephone number of the IRS Taxpayer Advocate Service office in Houston or Brooklyn. Calls may be ‘robo-calls’ that request a call back. Once the taxpayer returns the call, the con artist requests personal information, including Social Security number or individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN).

TAS can help protect your taxpayer rights. TAS can help if you need assistance resolving an IRS problem, if your problem is causing financial difficulty, or if you believe an IRS system or procedure isn’t working as it should. TAS does not initiate calls to taxpayers “out of the blue.” Typically, a taxpayer would contact TAS for help first, and only then would TAS reach out to the taxpayer.

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