Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that knows the Self Storage business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
"We highly recommend Jerry Jones, a CPA in Reno, NV to anyone who is interested in being advised in all areas of their tax planning in an efficient and expert manner. He is a very dedicated individual who works hard for his clients, handling all of his clients personally, and follows through on every part of the tax-filing process. Jerry is extremely knowledgeable with the regulations and requirements needed to successfully calculate both personal and business taxes, and is vigilant in keeping up with the latest laws, updates, and changes. Jerry is a creative thinker who has always made himself available outside of normal business hours to answer our questions. We particularly appreciate the occasional emails he sends out apprising his clients of changes to the tax code that could affect us. If you are looking for an engaged, and thoroughly competent CPA, look no further."
Chris & Amanda Schroeder, Reno, NV

The IRS isn't calling you — it's a scam, and here's what to do if it happens to you

The IRS isn't exactly modern.

IRS-phone-call-scam-Jerry-JonesIf it needs to get in touch with a taxpayer, it sends a letter — not an email, not a phone call, and definitely not a message over social media. Especially in cases of tax fraud.

So when I recently got a voicemail admonishing me for supposed issues with the tax return I filed a few weeks ago, I knew it had to be the latest IRS phone scam.

A phone number from Washington, DC, called me and left a voicemail when I didn't answer.

It was an automated message that said:

"Time sensitive and urgent ... we found that there was a fraud and misconduct on your tax which you are hiding from federal government. This needs to be rectified immediately, so please return the call as soon as you receive the message."

It told me to return the call to the same DC-area phone number displayed on my caller ID. It's pretty clear this was a scam call, if not for the simple reason that the caller did not identify themselves as someone from the IRS. Also, as previously mentioned, the IRS prefers snail mail.

This is a sophisticated step in the latest tax scam Americans need to watch out for, according to the IRS. Scammers file a fake tax return with stolen personal information, like your Social Security number, and then use actual bank account information to have the refund deposited into your own account.

Then they call to collect, posing as the IRS or debt collectors demanding the return of the fraudulent tax refund. In some cases, the caller threatens criminal fraud charges, an arrest warrant, and to "blacklist" the taxpayer's Social Security Number.

30 Ways Your Tax Return Could Trigger an IRS Audit

audit-IRS-tax-advice-Jerry-Jones-cpaRED FLAGS

For most taxpayers, it's unlikely that they will be audited by the IRS. But that doesn't mean it's completely out of the question. While the number of audits dropped to its lowest point in 14 years last year, the IRS knows that every $1 spent on audits brings in $4 to the Treasury Department. We spoke to several tax experts and found out just what the IRS is looking for when it's considering an audit and how you can trigger an audit through mistakes, oversights, and not-so-brilliant deductions.

DEVIATE FROM THE NORM

The IRS freely admits that it needs only a single anomaly to audit a return. Sometimes, audits are based solely on a statistical formula that your return had the misfortune of deviating from. The IRS develops those "norms" from audits of a statistically valid random sample of returns, as part of the National Research Program the IRS conducts. Basically, even some minor, unexplained glitch in your return can trigger an audit.

Steps Victims Can Take to Minimize Effect of Data Theft

steps-to-protect-victims-tax-law-IRSEvery day, the theft of personal and financial information puts people at risk of identity theft. Generally, thieves try to use the stolen data as quickly as possible to:

  • Sell the information to other criminals.
  • Withdraw money from a bank account.
  • Make credit card purchases.
  • File a fraudulent tax return for a refund using victims' names.

Victims of a data loss should follow these steps to minimize the effect of the theft:

  • Try to determine what information the thieves compromised. Compromised information may include emails and passwords, or more sensitive data, such as name and Social Security number.

  • Take advantage of credit monitoring services when offered by the affected organization.

  • Place a freeze on credit accounts to prevent access to credit records. It varies by state, but there may be a fee to place a freeze on an account. At a minimum, victims should place a fraud alert on their credit accounts by contacting one of the three major credit bureaus. A fraud alert isn't as secure as a freeze, but it's free.

  • Reset passwords on online accounts, especially those of financial sites and email and social media accounts. Use different passwords for each account. Some experts recommend at least 10-digit passwords, mixing letters, numbers and special characters. Victims may also wish to consider using a password manager or app.

Don't Fall for These 20 Common Tax Myths

tax-return-myth-jerry-jones-cpaOWE NO

To say the U.S. tax system is confusing is an understatement, so it's no wonder there are many misconceptions about the rules. The good news is that most people make less than $100,000 in a year and have no income other than their paychecks, so they can fill out the comparatively brief and very direct short form; almost everyone who uses the 1040EZ can fill it out themselves. For everybody else, though, the baffling mysteries of the tax code prevail, and can ultimately cost money. To help unravel some of the perplexities of the system, here are 12 common tax myths debunked. It might save money and sanity when the deadline rolls around.

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