Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that knows the Self Storage business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
Selecting a CPA goes far beyond a professional to prepare the tax return, or even to help with a little planning to reduce taxes. Jerry not only has the expertise and experience to meet and exceed the tax prep requirement, but goes far beyond with retirement planning and he advises in making business decisions that could have a tax impact in the future. What really sets Jerry apart from the crowd is that he not only has a lot of Self-Storage experience, but he cares about my business, and looks for ways to help me make MORE money. Anyone can find a CPA to spend money, but it is rare to find one that actually INCREASES my revenue…and then protects it from taxation! Jerry is a “keeper”!
RK Kliebenstein
Author “How to Make MORE Money in Self Storage”

New IRS publication helps taxpayers Get Ready for tax reform

The IRS issued a new publication to help taxpayers learn about tax reform and how it affects their taxes. Taxpayers can access Publication 5307, Tax Reform Basics for Individuals and Families, on IRS.gov/getready.

IRS Resources Can Help Small Businesses Better Understand How Tax Reform Affects Their Bottom Line

Small business owners can visit IRS.gov for a wide range of resources that will help them better understand tax reform. Last year’s Tax Cuts and Jobs Act includes tax law changes that may affect small businesses’ bottom line.

Here are some resources available to help small business owners:

Tax Reform section of IRS.gov
This section of IRS.gov includes links to resources that will help businesses understand exactly how the law affects their bottom line.

Tax Reform Guidance
Includes links to resources with specific technical information about the law and how it applies to businesses. These resources include, regulations, revenue procedures, revenue rulings and notices.

3 Awful Reasons to Take Social Security Benefits at 62

Because Social Security eligibility kicks in at age 62, many seniors rush to claim benefits as early as possible. But there's a downside to filing at 62: reducing your benefits by taking them ahead of full retirement age (FRA).

For today's workers, FRA is either 66, 67, or 66 and a certain number of months -- it all depends on your year of birth. Either way, filing at 62 means taking benefits early and reducing them in the process.

What sort of reduction are we talking about? If you're looking at an FRA of 67, filing at 62 will slash your benefits by 30%. And unless you happen to undo your application in time, once you lock in that lower benefit, it'll remain in effect for the rest of your life.

Now there are certain circumstances under which claiming benefits at 62 makes sense. But these three reasons for filing early just don't.

How Much Do You Need to Earn to Max Out Your Social Security Benefit?

The maximum Social Security benefit for a new retiree in 2018 is north of $33,000 per year at full retirement age and can be even higher for workers who wait. So how much do you need to earn if you want the maximum Social Security benefit when you retire?

Unfortunately, this question is more complicated than it may seem. Here's a rundown of how much you can get from Social Security, how much you'll need to have earned to get the maximum benefit, and how the maximum benefit amount could change in the future.

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