Jerry Jones CPA
Wouldn’t it be nice to have a CPA that you deal directly with, that knows the Self Storage business, that works in all 50 states and is there for you when you need him?
Following construction and 2 years of operating my self storage facility, I had become uneasy with my previous accountant’s fees and related IRS filings. My search for alternatives led me to Jerry. His knowledge of the storage business resulted in significant savings that had not been taken advantage of by my previous accountant. Now I can feel comfortable by giving Jerry a call on small considerations, as well as major financial planning. For business or personal financing I highly recommend Jerry to all of my customers and friends.
Tim Farrell
Anchor Storage, LLC, Nevada

Tax Preparedness Series: Tax Records – What to Keep

tax-records-jerry-jones-cpa-irsNote: This is the fifth in a series of reminders to help taxpayers prepare for the upcoming tax filing season.

WASHINGTON – As tax filing season approaches, the Internal Revenue Service has information for taxpayers who wonder how long to keep tax returns and other documents.

Generally, the IRS recommends keeping copies of tax returns and supporting documents at least three years. Some documents should be kept up to seven years in case a taxpayer needs to file an amended return or if questions arise. Keep records relating to real estate up to seven years after disposing of the property.

Health care information statements should be kept with other tax records. Taxpayers do not need to send these forms to IRS as proof of health coverage. The records taxpayers should keep include records of any employer-provided coverage, premiums paid, advance payments of the premium tax credit received and type of coverage. Taxpayers should keep these – as they do other tax records – generally for three years after they file their tax returns.

Having a Backup of Company Data Does Not Mean You Have a Disaster Recovery Plan

You’ve heard over and over again that you must have a secure backup of your company data, but have you stopped to consider what you’d do in the event of a disaster? How would that data be restored to a fully functioning office environment?

The answer to those questions hinges on two variables – first, what was the nature of the disaster? Second, what type of backup do you have?

Put in slightly different terms, having a backup of your company’s data merely means that you have a copy stored somewhere, it does not mean you have an instantaneous way to restore your company’s network back to full functionality. This is not what you want to hear and comes as a shock to many business owners who thought they’d done what they needed to do by having a backup of their data.

IRS, Partners Urge Strong Passwords Help Protect Identities at Tax Time and Beyond

password-irs-tax-safety-jerry-jonesThe Internal Revenue Services and its partners, in the fight against identity theft, urge computer users to strengthen their passwords.

The password serves as the first line of defense to stop hackers and identity thieves from accessing your computer, mobile phone and other internet-accessible devices.

The IRS, state tax agencies and the tax professional industry are asking for your help in their effort to combat identity theft and fraudulent tax returns. Working in partnership with you, we can make a difference.

Avoid Identity Theft; Learn How to Recognize Phishing Scams

phishing-scam-identity-theft-jerry-jones-cpaSimply ask for it. That’s the easiest way for an identity thief to steal your personal information.

Each day, people fall victim to phishing scams through emails, texts or phone calls and mistakenly turn over important data. In turn, cybercriminals try to use that data to file fraudulent tax returns or commit other crimes.

The Internal Revenue Service, state tax agencies and the tax industry -- all partners in the fight against identity theft -- urge you to learn to recognize and avoid phishing scams.

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